T.M.I.com

mirandaShea Allen, a reporter for the ABC affiliate in Huntsville, AL has been all over the national news recently. Not because of her hard-hitting news coverage, but because she was “allegedly” fired for her personal blog, Shea Allen Says… Actually one post in particular where Shea confesses that she’s frightened of old people and refuses to do stories involving them, her best sources have a secret crush on her, and she’s gone without a bra during a live report – and no one noticed.

I realize that Shea is a media personality and therefore her actions may very well have more drastic consequences, but I can’t help but think how this is the world in which we live. Chronicling your life on social media is the “it” thing nowadays. In fact, in its “State of the Net” report last year, Consumer Reports found that 52% of social network users post risky information online.

It may be a graphic birth story – pictures included (this is becoming more frequent in my life because my friends and I are of childbearing age), medical oddities (I don’t need daily updates on the progress of your toe fungus), gushy love confessions (you are in love and wish we all were lucky enough to find an amazing partner in life, we get it), bitter/angry rants about people who “know who they are” (do they? And who really cares, I am sure they are lame anyways) or pity parties (if you are really a fat ugly loser, you aren’t going to tell the world) we are certainly sharing more than ever – including a few not-so-innocent things no one really needs or wants to know.

I am not totally innocent in this epidemic but I fear social media is making us less social because we are too busy updating our status, tagging our friends and filtering our photos to actually enjoy the memories we are making. I welcome any thoughts on how to kick (or at least curb) the addiction!

Posted by Miranda

Image source pingler.com

One response to “T.M.I.com

  1. A month or so ago I attended “Social Savvy,” a networking event at the WorkBar that was hosted by the authors of “Social Media for Dummies,” and they discussed the same issue–that we may be hiding behind our social media accounts rather than embracing experiences as they happen. One woman at the event, however, brought up the increasing frequency of #latergram showing up in her friends Instagram posts. So maybe, like so many other fads, the obsession with instant social media updates will ebb and wane with time. I notice it in my friends posts, as well, that more and more often pictures from the weekend are appearing on Instagram throughout the week #latergram, along with comments about how they wish they could be back in that time or place. So just maybe the concept of nostalgia isn’t dead for good.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s